What was the Garrison Literary and Benevolent Association? It was a 19th century association of young Black American males, whose main purpose was promoting the abolition of slavery and the reformation of society.

The Garrison Literary and Benevolent Association was an all male club that began in New York City under the leadership of Henry Highland Garnet (December 23, 1815 – February 13, 1882), an Black American abolitionist, minister, and educator, David Ruggles (March 15, 1810 – December 16, 1849), an Black American abolitionist in Brooklyn, New York, and William Howard Day (October 16, 1825 – December 3, 1900), an Black American abolitionist, editor, educator, and minister. The club was established in March of 1834.

At their first meeting one-hundred and fifty Black American youth under the age twenty years gathered at a public school. The Garrison Literary and Benevolent Association name was controversial and drew immediate reactions. A city official told the young men, they would have to choose a different name for their society if they wanted to continue to use public facilities. The young men rebel against the threat, retain their society name and rented a new meeting space.

The Garrison Literary and Benevolent Association society faded in history. Nothing more is known about this society, but some said the Garrison Literary and Benevolent Association formed into Mason Brotherhood, but this is still uncertain.

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